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HYPESOUL
HYPESOUL

The aim of TISA is to strengthen the rules and improve access to the trade in services markets. Specifically, the agreement negotiated between the parties addresses discriminatory barriers to cross-border trade in services, provides a more predictable investment environment for service providers and improves the mobility of service providers. The parties to the negotiations are considering proposals on, among others, transparency, national regulation, financial services, telecommunications, e-commerce, the free movement of individuals, international shipping services, air services, state-owned enterprises and express delivery services. The TiSA also threatens to endanger net neutrality, the principle that internet service providers do not prefer certain types of content. The United States has put forward a proposal that “consumers should be able to access all services and applications on the Internet, subject to proper network management” (our priority). The term “good management” is very flexible. Internet service providers (ISPs) could, for example, decide to slow down some sites and speed up others, because large companies pay for them and it is considered “adequate management” for ISPs to reap the benefits. The agreement has been criticized for the secrecy surrounding the negotiations. The front page of the negotiating document leaked by Wikileaks reads: “Declassify on: five years after the TISA agreement came into force or, if no agreement enters into force, five years after the conclusion of the negotiations.” [2] Because of this practice, it is not possible to be informed of the liberalisation rules that the participating countries propose for the future agreement. Only Switzerland has the practice of making public on the Internet all the proposals it has made to the other parties since June 2012.

[5] The European Union did not publish its “offer” for TISA until July 2014[14] after the Wikileaks revelation. TiSA`s approach to state-owned enterprises (SOEs) is an example. In the past, many rich countries have contributed to the development of their public services by providing benefits to state-owned enterprises, including efficient monopolies, subsidies and cheap credits, as well as talented land or premises. Many developing countries continue to depend on SOEs for substantial income and a number of services. In the case of India, the OECD found that SOEs were used as engines of growth, contradicting socio-economic inequalities, generating productive jobs and generating funds for economic development. However, this path to the development of public services is closed by the TiSA, as the TiSA annex gives countries the right to challenge each other when they grant “non-commercial aid” to public providers.

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